Ah vitam aeternaam , 2015, neons, untinted glass, wooden base, H.170 cm, W. 35 x D. 70 cm (side A)

Ad vitam aeternam, 2015, neons, untinted glass, wooden base - 35 x 70 cm, h.170 cm (side B)

Surprise le cul entre deux chaises, 2015, steel tubes, neon, wooden base, H.190 cm, W. 40, D. 70 cm (Side A)

Surprise le cul entre deux chaises, 2015, steel tubes, neon, wooden base, H.190 cm, W. 40, D. 70 cm (Side B)

Echo, 2016, plexiglass, metal, water, wooden base, H. 120 cm , W. 50 cm, D. 50 cm, (éd.5).  Alternate vibration each 30 seconds.

Echo, 2016, plexiglass, metal, water, wooden base, H. 120 cm , W. 50 cm, D. 50 cm, (éd.5).  Alternate vibration each 30 seconds.

Valse A4, 2016, aluminium sheets, metal wires, wood, W. 300 cm (Side A).

Valse A4, 2016, aluminium sheets, metal wires, wood, W. 300 cm (Side B).

Miroir Ardent, 2016, mirror, charred timber, steel, gold leaf (Side A)

Miroir Ardent, 2016, mirror, charred timber, steel, gold leaf (Side B)

Blow, 2016, brass wires, wooden base, H157 cm, W. 20 cm, D. 125 cm (éd.5). (Side B)

Blow, 2016, brass wires, wooden base, H157 cm, W. 20 cm, D. 125 cm (éd.5). (Side A)

Sans titre, 2016, mirror, wooden base, Diam. 150 cm, H. 110 cm, (éd. 5). (Side A).

Sans titre, 2016, mirror, wooden base, Diam. 150 cm, H. 110 cm, (éd. 5). (Side B).

Profil vue de fesse, 2016, steel wires, wooden base,  H. 161 cm, L. 35 cm, D. 50 cm (éd.5). (Side A)

Profil vue de fesse, 2016, steel wires, wooden base,  H. 161 cm, L. 35 cm, D. 50 cm (éd.5). (Side B)

Profil vue de fesse, 2016, steel wires, wooden base,  H. 161 cm, L. 35 cm, D. 50 cm (éd.5). (Side C)

Satyre, 2016, mirror polished, steel, H. 189 cm, diam. 84.5 cm (éd.5). (Side A).

Press Release

Geneva (Switzerland), August 2016 - Artvera's Gallery opens the season in great fanfare with six months of surprising contemporary exhibitions.  From 23 September to 12 November the elegant arcade in the Rue Étienne Dumont gets on FIRE! (FEU !) with Robin Bucher and Patrick Csajko, alias RB/CP, who explore the term in total freedom, thanks to the technique of anamorphosis.

From 23 September 2016 Artvera’s Gallery is devoting its whole space to great young Swiss artists who will set the place on Fire; « It’s an irrational fascination that compels us to dig into the chapters it represents. As if drawn by its light and inflamed by their desire to master the fire, RBCP define their vocation, which burns with a passion for all that is in movement. Inspired by the great opposites, the divine and the erotic, light and darkness, realism and illusionism, they create « the visual and physical intrigue. »

The exhibition FEU! provides a look at the research path taken by the two artists over recent years by using the numerous variations of the ancient technique of anamorphosis. An entertaining programme composed of installations in situ, of unique sculptures where the spectator is called upon to apprehend the work in its abstract and conceptual form.
There’s also the question of finding the other point of view that the artists have hidden and which belies the initial interpretation. Anamorphosis is the technique of the work within the work, a value added to the artists’ formal and conceptual quest which completes, or calls into question, the forms and volumes perceived.

 

Many contemporary artists have adopted this technique to represent the dizziness of perceptions of today’s world, in which a word can be transformed into its exact opposite in function of the context in which it is expressed. However, anamorphosis was born during the Renaissance, after the discovery of perspective, and consequently represents a turning point for figurative art with respect to awareness of the multiplicity of perspectives, points of view and secrets used to create astonishing optical effects within works, rich in meaning and symbolism.

The creative genius of Robin and Patrick, free of the symbolism and academic nature of the old classical world, has retained the desire to dazzle the spectator by embarking on an increasingly complex study of forms which continuously change with every movement around the work. Thus the artists become the creators of a film in which the view changes every time the observer moves. The spectator is therefore the active protagonist of the cognitive process of the work performed and not just a passive observer.

Selected Press